Contents The Gallery College Trips

 

 


1950s
1960s
1970s
1980s

Related Memories


1950s Photos

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Germany (Black Forest) 1953   Paris 1954 (PDF + 5 photos)  
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Austria 1954 (5 photos)   Lake District Easter 1955
(8 photos)
 
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Göttingen 1955 (12 photos) Felixstowe Funfair 1955 North Wales Easter 1956  

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Lake District 1956 Unknown location France 1957  

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Kandersteg (Switzerland) 1958
(7 photos)
Engineering Trip c1959 (2 photos) Ingleton 1959  

1960s Photos

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Göttingen Exchange 1960 (2 photos)

Göttingen Exchange 1961

Göttingen Exchange 1962
(see the account - below)

 

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Ingleton 1962

Meisenheim 1962

Geog. Field Trip Easter 1963
(2 photos)

 
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Göttingen Exchange 1963
(6 photos)
Greece 1963
(10 photos)
1964/5 - but where?  
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Biology Field Trip c1965 CGS at the Seaside c1965 Netherlands 1968/69 (3 photos)  

1970s Photos

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Geog Field Trip 1976 (2 photos)

Keld Field Trip 1977 (3 photos)

Cavell boat trip 1978

 

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SS Uganda - September 1978

SS Uganda - September 1979
Part 1 (5 photos)

SS Uganda - September 1979
Part 2 (1 photo)

1980s Photos

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Paris Weekend 1987

Aprica 1987 Holland 1989 (4 photos)  
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SS Uganda - Dec 1981 'The Walk' - Oct 1988
(51 photos)
   

Related Memories

Geography Field Trip (mid-60s)

I remember getting pissed as a handcart for the first time ever with Willy Weston on the geog trip to Swanage in the mid 60s.   We were doing one of those land-use traverses along a strip of 6" to the mile map.  Fortunately for us, we'd walked the last mile or so of our bit to the coast the previous day and knew that it was all sheep pasture to the edge of the cliff. Accordingly, we decided to suss out the land use of the 'Square and Compasses' at Worth Matravers where they sold cider straight from a barrel on the bar - it must have been about 5 - 6% abv.

We should have known better - you couldn't see through it when it was poured into the glass.  It doesn't affect the brain so much as the knees, and the result was that, after no lunch and four pints, the locals, having had a huge laugh at our expense, arranged for us to cadge a lift in a builder's truck back to the guest house in Swanage.  Needless to say, the evening map-making session was a bit of a blur but we survived OK.  I think it was also on that trip that I smoked my first fag - a Craven 'A' (I remember that much...).  Bloody awful it was too.

I can't remember too many people who were on the trip although Mick Hammond and (I think) Eddie Walker were  two of them.  It was also slightly notable as I believe that Willy and I set a precedent as the first 5th formers to go on a 6th form geog trip - maybe someone can tell us differently.  Anyway, it was entirely due to the generosity of Doc Staveley and Gerald Siviour who allowed us to go as there were some spare places.  I also remember there being some highly attractive although (to me anyway) unattainable Upper 6th girls on the trip.  Ah well - at least a boy could dream ....

Alan Dean


Trip to Paris (c1965)

We had a French mistress called 'Fanny' Hill. She and Boothroyd ran a school trip to Paris and Annecy -1965ish - and gave  me my first wine-slurping experiences.  Boothroyd used to wear a beret and smoke Gauloises to prove that he taught French.  He also had a dead cool French Resistance style mac like the girl in 'Allo 'Allo.

I remember Fanny explaining how one had to eat bread to clear the palate when wine tasting, while she left lipstick all over the glass.  Odd the little things you remember.  I recall cutting my finger badly while attempting to hack the cork out of a bottle with a penknife I had just bought.  I still have the scar.

Francis Wright and I tried to score with Stephanie and Louise but I can't remember whom with whom. Anyway we both failed miserably!  As I took zillions of pictures I gained the nickname 'Clicking' Gomeche.  Some of them even came out.  I wonder?  Nah - gone for good, which might be just as well.

I smoked my first fags - Craven A with the cork tips , which they actually claimed in the ads were good for coughs and other medical conditions.  Hard to believe now.  Anyway, they were disgusting.  Francis sensibly and derisively called them 'tubes' and refused to participate.

The staff spent their whole time trying to catch girls in our rooms.  'Gomeche!  Is there a girl in your room?'  'No Miss' ..... while  a girl was actually hiding in my cupboard at the time.  £500 for me not to say whom.  Actually, I honestly can't remember, but definitely not Stephanie or Louise unfortunately, who would never  have been found dead in my cupboard nor anyone else's come to that probably.

Annecy was in France (and still is probably - although Alsace Lorraine has changed hands a few times) but is very close to Geneva - we went to the UN there one day - really exciting ... er ... not . But the cable cars were fun.

In Annecy one morning  we were all very bored & looking over the parapet of some bridge, when a local paper took our picture and ran a very flowery story on these English loonies who actually wanted to come to Annecy.  This caused much excitement; us suddenly all being media stars and all that.  Boothroyd went along to the newspaper office and got us all copies of the pictures.  I went and found myself an agent and from  then on demanded payment to appear in Seeley's Gloucester House photos.  Actually that is the sort of thing I would have done - 'Attitude' being my middle name!

Ian Gomeche


The French Trip

We went to Millau and Paris, where 3 people got busted for shoplifting.  Discovered French food and wine for the first time. "Puppet on a string" was our entry for the Eurovision song contest. We sang it whilst walking around Millau to annoy the locals who countered with the French equivalent. Met a French lad who taught us how to swear in French so we reciprocated. Made up an obscene version of "la Marseilles" and sang it on the train.

Stephen Farthing (Canterbury 1962-70)


Göttingen Exchange, 1962 (from the 1963 College Magazine)

On the afternoon of 13th August, 20 girls were busy settling themselves in Salisbury House and making comparisons with their normal Houses.  But soon they were on the way by coach to Harwich to meet their friends of the 1961 party from Gottingen led by the popular Herr Meyer.  His previous experiences stood him in good stead and we were almost in the unenviable position of finding our guests waiting for us. We hustled them in the coach and were soon having supper at the College with everyone behaving as old inhabitants.

The next morning some of the girls were almost too shy to enter the City Hall in Norwich to be entertained by the Lord Mayor of Norwich, Mr. Andrew Ryrie - the shyness appeared mainly due to the presence of a news-reel camera and not the Lord Mayor.  But the German girls discovered that not everyone speaks English with the same accent as their school teachers. On returning to the College for lunch, television cameras were evident and during the afternoon a ten minute programme about the exchange was recorded for transmission that evening. And due to the kindness of the resident staff, all the girls were able to view this programme and many to see themselves on the screen.

The week-ends were spent in the English homes and excursions were made on the other days. The tide was against us at Blakeney and we had to wade through the mud in both directions but, at least, we were back in the coach before the cloudburst descended.  But, in spite of the weather, we were able to follow
our programme and the rain chiefly occurred when we were on the coach or when we could seek shelter for tea indoors at Granchester.  But towards the end we were greeted with a warm sunny afternoon in Windsor and we were able to persuade our visitors that we do occasionally have a summer's day.

All too soon the 27th August arrived and we were sorry that the fortnight was over and then we were waving goodbye as the coach left the College.  Exactly 48 hours later, Mr. Dudley, Miss Dolan, Miss Wigham and Mr. Taylor were starting the same journey with another 22 girls from the College, two of whom were making a return visit to Gottingen.  A smooth crossing on the steamer and early the next morning we were on the train to Amsterdam. We were soon getting a wonderful impression of the place from our motor launch touring the canals. The lunch showed familiar and unfamiliar dishes and most girls seemed to think that
there was safety in the familiar. And then the train journey to Gottingen where we arrived after midnight, most of the party appeared on the platform but two girls were so comfortably settled in the train that they nearly went on to - well it could have been Genoa.

And then we found the strangeness of a continental town which soon became familiar, as did the coach for our varied excursions. The trip to Wolfsburg stands out most with our visit to the Volkswagen works. Everyone was highly impressed with the organisation that enables a complete car to be assembled in two hours, and also the sight of a car being completed every 16 seconds. Even the factory itself, a mile long and two-thirds as wide, was equally impressive. But we were not able to go outdoors to see the arrangements for delivery of 4,000 cars a day by train because the weather was typically British.

The Hartz mountains were admired, together with the old city of Goslar, while the ski lift at St. Andreasberg gave us a wonderful view. Schools were seen at Osterode and, of course Göttingen. Factories were visited also at Immenhausen making glassware, in Göttingen making school science equipment, and the Coca Cola factory. But the latter was more of a social occasion than anything else. The school sports were seen at Göttingen and we were officially received in the Town Hall and shown the Conference Chamber.  But soon we found ourselves on the train to Hannover and, almost immediately afterwards, travelling to the Hook of Holland. The steamer left soon after our arrival and we woke up to the sight of Harwich. Our coach was waiting and then at the College we could hardly say goodbye-back to school in three days for the new term.

E.D. [Eric Dudley - Ed.]

 


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Wymondham College Remembered